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Priority setting e-forum

Participate in the discussions on the factors that limit banana yields and income and the research options to address them.

Description of identified research options for priority assessment exercise

Geert Claessens Tuesday, 30 April 2013

1) Risk assessment, diagnostic tools, predictive models and strategy for disease surveillance

Target domain: Great Lakes region – southern Uganda / E DRC / NW Tanzania / Burundi / Rwanda where significant % of population is resource poor and mal-nourished and dependent on banana.

Intervention: Safeguarding banana production from exotic disease incursion and further spread of endemic diseases; i.e. prevent introduction of: TR4, Freckle, Ralstonia (blood and Moko), bract mosaic and mosaic; and improved management systems through rapid and precise detection and appropriate management of BXW, BBTV, FOC, Sigatokas (Mycosphaerella musicola, M. fijiensis, M. emusae), and nematodes (emerging Pratylenchus in addition to Radopholus).

Research outputs:

  1. national, regional, continental and global disease distribution maps;
  2. diagnostic tool kits for lab and field (factsheet, diagnostic keys, manuals, serological and molecular methods);
  3. agreed contingency plans to limit exotic disease outbreaks;
  4. establishment of protocols for management of the further spread of endemic diseases;
  5. technical capacity created for disease diagnostics and reporting for research, extension and regulators;
  6. create and manage knowledge database;
  7. develop risk assessment criteria for introduction of exotic and management of endemic diseases to guide target areas surveillance, to refine mitigation strategies based on critical control points as influenced by cultivation and trade parameters.

Expected timeline:
Phase I (0 - 1 years): Scoping study – literature search; evaluation of current field conditions and individual and institutional competences; implementation framework;
Phase II (1 - 5 years): Implementation and evaluation of system - capacity building; test responsiveness of system to curtail disease incursions and spread; recommendations on how to optimize methods, responsibilities, knowledge sharing; identification of diagnostic needs; development of prototype tools;
Phase III (5 – 15 years): Sustainability and implementation of system. Refinement of methods incl. diagnostic tools and feedback loops to refine mechanisms.

Adoption:  protection of yield on area grown with susceptible cultivars where disease is currently not present (use likely pattern and speed of disease spread instead of adoption curve).

Impact type:  yield losses averted; avoidance of price increase (likely if local production eradicated); increased investment in banana sector due to higher level of confidence in disease prevention, containment, and/or eradication.

2) Integrated management of XW and other bacterial diseases in small-holder systems

Target domain: East and Central Africa (Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, DR Congo, Burundi and Ethiopia); Asia and Latin America (for transgenic varieties).

Intervention: Developing and deploying resistant varieties; evaluation and dissemination of genotypes escaping insect vector transmission; assessing constraints to adoption, understanding gender roles for enhanced adoption; raising public awareness to enhance adoption; develop low-cost macro-propagation units; develop stakeholders’ platforms for delivery of clean and/or resistant planting materials; better understanding of host-pathogen interaction for more easily adoptable control packages; socio-economic impact assessment.

Research outputs:

  1. resistant varieties developed and deployed (GM);
  2. improved cultural practices validated and disseminated;
  3. low-cost field diagnostic kit developed and deployed.

Expected timeline:
7 years to obtain research output “GM variety”, one more year before dissemination starts, dissemination phase of 10-15 years;
5-7 years to obtain research output “improved cultural practices”, dissemination would start at onset of project (continuous fine-tuning of package during project duration), dissemination phase of 3 -5 years;
4-5 years to obtain research output “diagnostic kit”; dissemination phase of 3-5 years once output ready.

Adoption:
GM variety: adoption starts in year 8, ceiling of 75% reached 5-10 years after first adoption;
Varieties that escape insect-mediated wilt infection; adoption starts in year 5; 75% ceiling in 3-5 years after adoption;
Improved cultural practices: starts in year 1, ceiling of 75% reached 5 – 7 years after first adoption

Impact type: yield loss prevented; yield recovery where disease has already reduced yields; yield increase due to improved cultural practices; small scale banana-based industries revived.

3) Recovery of smallholder banana production in areas affected by banana bunchy top disease

Target domain: diverse smallholder perennial systems of EAHB, Plantain (AAB), AAA-Cavendish in Asia (Philippines, Taiwan, Vietnam, Sri Lanka), West and Central Africa (DR Congo, Republic of Congo (Brazzaville), Equatorial Guinea, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Gabon, Benin, Nigeria), East Africa (Burundi, Rwanda), and Southern Africa (Malawi, Angola, Zambia)

Intervention: clean seed supply through tissue culture and/or macro propagation, community strategies for a fallow period free of bananas, approaches for reducing re-infection and parallel cropping system intensification.

Research outputs:

  1. diagnostic tools;
  2. genetic resource evaluation for mechanisms of tolerance and susceptibility and expression of symptoms;
  3. strategies for supplying clean planting material;
  4. epidemiology of BBTV and aphids;
  5. piloting integrated approaches to the recovery of BBTD affected areas.

Expected timeline:

Phase I (0 - 5 years): pilot approaches based on existing information/ technologies;
Phase II (5 - 10 years): improved pilot approaches incorporating lessons/research results of P I;
Phase III (10 - 20 years): large scale use of outputs (based on strategies developed in P I and II).

Adoption: expected to start in year 6, ceiling of 50-80% reached in year 20 (region specific).

Impact type: yield loss prevented; yield recovery where disease has already reduced yields, NR effects due to shifts to annual crops such as cassava which may result in greater soil erosion.

4) Sustainable intensification of banana-based cropping systems

Target domain: smallholder farmers that potentially have good access to (urban) markets and grow plantain (AAB) in West and Central Africa and Latin America, EAHB in East Africa, dessert bananas in Southern Africa, East and West Africa and Asia and ABB in Asia.

Intervention: integrated crop intensification package adapted to the local biophysical and socio-economic environment. The composition of the intensification package will depend on key production and market  constraints and opportunities and can include (a) quality planting material, (b) improved timing of production through adapted sucker/planting timing, (c) suitable varieties, (d) integrated soil fertility management (ISFM), (e) integrated pest management (IPM) of weevils, nematodes, leaf diseases, (f) alternative plant densities, (g) irrigation / water management,  and (h) novel and improved intercrop systems.

Research outputs:

  1. Diagnostic survey tools and models to identify key constraints and related entry points to improve yields -> decision making tools to prioritize investments;
  2. Targeted technology pathways and packages for improved productivity;
  3. Communication / training tools, including technical sheets, short videos to reach end-users through training of trainers, (innovative and effective) farmer organizations.

Expected timeline:
Phase I (0 - 5 years): product identification, development and testing;
Phase II (5 - 10 years): validation, local adaptation, scaling out strategy & tools;
Phase III (10 - 20 years): scaling out.

Adoption: expected to start in year 5, ceiling of 80% reached in year 20.

Impact type: yield increase, NR effects, reduced prices (for urban consumers).

5) Sustainable Fusarium wilt management system

Target domain: disease affected area of Cavendish, Gros Michel and others (AAA), Prata and Silk subgroups (AAB), Pisang awak and Bluggoe ABB types grown by small scale banana farmers;

LAC: 30% of area with Cavendish and Gros Michel (AAA), Silk, Prata (AAB) and Bluggoe and Pisang awak ABB types;
Tropical Asia: 80% of Cavendish and other AAA group, Silk (AAB) and Pisang awak area;
South Asia: 60% of Pisang awak and Silk area in India and Bangladesh;
South Africa: 40% of Cavendish area;
West, Central and East Africa: ?.

Intervention: Develop and promote sustainable integrated management approach of Fusarium wilt.

Research outputs:

  1. resistant varieties;
  2. improved cultural practices;
  3. biocontrol procedures, including suppressive soils;
  4. Fusarium population structure knowledge and race specific diagnostic tool;
  5. improved seed multiplication and distribution.


Expected timeline:
9 years to obtain all research outputs (some outputs will be achieved earlier i.e. during project duration); 1 year gap after outputs are available before dissemination will start (capacity building, training and lobbying among NARS, NGO´s, Private entrepreneurs, Ministries of Agriculture, Plant protection organizations).


Adoption:
Asia: expected adoption ceiling of 80% of target area reached 5 years after first adoption;
LAC and Africa: expected adoption ceiling of 40% of target area reached 8 years after first adoption.

Impact type: yield loss prevented; yield recovery where disease has already reduced yields.

6) Rapid and enhanced genetic gains by diploid breeding

Target domain:
cultivar groups targeted: (a) AAA East African highland bananas, (b) AAB plantains, (c) AAB dessert bananas, (d) AAA dessert bananas;
Geographic regions targeted: (a) Great Lakes Region of Africa: (b) West and Central African lowlands + Congo basin: (c) Brazil and India; (d) Global smallholders for local markets.

Intervention: recurrent selection with progeny testing to improve diploid populations to generate elite diploid hybrids for further used as parents in 3x-2x or 4x-2x inter-mating. Tools such as marker-aided breeding, double haploids, genomic selection (including the use of genotyping-by-sequencing or next generation sequencing) will be applied to the diploid breeding populations.

Research outputs: Improved diploid populations and elite diploid parents as per end-user demands.

Expected timeline: 4 breeding cycles of 4 years each (due to mandatory progeny testing, particularly when pursuing reciprocal recurrent selection).

Adoption: Improved parents for breeding will available 4 years after each cycle of recurrent selection; outputs very likely to be used in breeding due to the lack of elite diploid breeding materials for use as parents in Musa genetic enhancement; likely users of the research outputs:  IITA, NARO, CARBAP, ICAR, EMBRAPA, CIRAD and other NARS elsewhere, particularly those newly engaging in Musa breeding; time required for new varieties based on improved parents to be available to farmers depends on next breeding step (i.e. their use for producing polyploidy hybrids) under each target trait, e.g. for host plant resistance to black leaf streak, Panama disease, bacterial wilt, banana weevil and other pests.

Impact type: research is targeting producing intermediate products that will accelerate and enhance genetic gains in plantain and banana breeding. The impact will be measured in terms of diversity of diploid sets of elite parents with required target traits as defined by end users. The long term benefits will be improved yields (as measured by unit of time and space) in banana and plantain cultivars.

7) Breeding for host plant resistance to pathogens and pests in banana

Target domain: (affected) small-holder production areas of:

  1. Highland bananas in Great Lakes Region;           
  2. Plantains in West, Central and East Africa, India, Brazil and other Latin American areas;
  3. Sweet acid banana in Brazil, India, and sub-Saharan Africa.

Intervention: mitigating losses from the mentioned pests/diseases (namely black leaf streak, nematodes, banana weevil and Fusarium wilt) through breeding for enhanced host plant resistance and improved management;

Research outputs:

  1. East African highland bananas resistant to nematodes, weevils, Fusarium wilt (FOC) and black leaf streak (BLS) and appropriate fruit quality;
  2. plantain resistant to BLS, nematodes, weevils and with improved suckering and fruit quality traits;
  3. sweet acid banana resistant to FOC, BLS, nematodes, and with improved  fruit quality traits.

Expected timeline: Time required to complete research outputs: 8 years;

Adoption:

  1. East African highland banana: expected adoption ceiling of 60% reached 10 years after first adoption.
  2. Plantain:

    • Brazil: expected adoption ceiling of 70% reached 15 years after first adoption
    • India: expected adoption ceiling of 20% reached 25 years after first adoption
    • East Africa: expected adoption ceiling of 100% reached 30 years after first adoption
    • West Africa: expected adoption ceiling of 50% reached 20 years after first adoption
    • LAC: expected adoption ceiling of 25% reached 15 years after first adoption.
  3. Sweet acid banana:

    • Brazil: expected adoption ceiling of 70% reached 10 years after first adoption
    • India: expected adoption ceiling of 20% reached 25 years after first adoption
    • East Africa: expected adoption ceiling of 90% reached 30 years after first adoption
    • West Africa: expected adoption ceiling of 25% reached 30 years after first adoption. 


Impact type: reduced yield loss from specified pests/diseases.

8) Better use / availability of existing genetic diversity for (a)biotic stress and consumer acceptability

Target domain: 50% of all banana production area (excluding Cavendish) globally across all regions for production systems ranging from backyard to monocrop systems.

Intervention: i) Better characterization/evaluation of edible land races (based on consumer preferences) and ii) systematic survey and evaluation of desired traits;methods to be applied: for i) survey of existing collections, select/multiply/clean; molecular/morpho-characterization, evaluation under varying conditions (space and time); ii) looking for naturally occurring clonal variation, inducing variability (e.g. in vitro culture, mutagenesis), identify/collect/multiply/evaluate/validate.

Research outputs:

  1. catalog of landraces evaluated for specific traits (useful for specific agro-ecologies);
  2. catalog of superior clonal selections with stable traits.

Expected timeline: research outputs obtained within 3 – 5 years

Adoption:

  1. Just in time supply system: dissemination starts 2 years after research outputs are available (dissemination through NGOs and government extension system); expected adoption ceiling of  40% reached 10 years after first adoption
  2. Adapting technology for waste use for local conditions: dissemination starts in 2nd year of research; (dissemination through NGOs and government extension system); expected adoption ceiling of 70% reached 5 years after first adoption
  3. Adapting processing technology to local conditions: dissemination starts 1 year after research outputs are available (dissemination through SME); expected adoption ceiling of 50% reached 10 years after first adoption


Impact type: reduced post-harvest and handling losses; lower processing costs; higher income for producers engaging in processing/value addition and selling by-products; increase in farm-gate price due to improved quality of produce (and reduced risk); reduced consumer prices; improved market access (price premium);

9) Extending utilization and reducing post-harvest losses

Target domain: Small and medium scale producers (for plantain processing and post-harvest options) in West and Central Africa and India; processors of banana (by-) products (East Africa and Latin America).

Intervention: : Reducing post-harvest losses and waste and/or expanding use of waste, decreasing processing costs and increasing income for small-scale producers/processors through improving post-harvest systems (just in time supply); processing and value addition (developing rural agri-business options for improved income and gender equity).

Research outputs:

  1. A system developed for timely delivering of high quality banana from producers to (actors further up the value chain such as retailers and ultimately) end-users;
  2. Technologies developed for value addition and increased commercialization of banana-waste;
  3. Processing technologies for banana-juice (East Africa) and plantain chips (West Africa) adapted to the local condition of mini- and small-sized companies in East and West Africa.

Expected timeline: research outputs obtained within 3 – 5 years.

Adoption:

  1. Just in time supply system: dissemination starts 2 years after research outputs are available (dissemination through private sector, NGOs and government extension system); expected adoption ceiling of 40% reached 10 years after first adoption;
  2. Adapting technology for waste use for local conditions: dissemination starts in 2nd year of research; (dissemination through private sector NGOs and government extension system); expected adoption ceiling of 70% reached 5 years after first adoption;
  3. Adapting processing technology to local conditions: dissemination starts one year after research outputs are available (dissemination through SME and NGOs); expected adoption ceiling of 50% reached 10 years after first adoption.

Impact type: reduced post-harvest and handling losses; lower processing costs; higher income for producers engaging in processing/value addition and selling by-products; increase in farm-gate price due to improved quality of produce (and reduced risk); improved market access (price premium).


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Rapid and enhanced genetic gains by diploid breeding

Geert Claessens Thursday, 11 April 2013

Working group participants: Alex Barekye and Rodomiro Ortiz

Research outputs:

  • Improved diploid populations and elite diploid parents as per end-user demands

Full results
 

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Integrated management of XW and other bacterial diseases in small-holder systems

Geert Claessens Thursday, 11 April 2013

Working group participants  Leena Tripathi, Eldad Karamura, Guy Blomme

  • Resistant varieties (GM)
  • Improved cultural practices
  • Low-cost field diagnostic kit

Full results
 

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Recovery of smallholder banana production in areas affected by banana bunchy top disease

Geert Claessens Thursday, 11 April 2013

Working group participants : Arega Alene, Célestin Niyongere, Charles Staver , Jim Lorenzen


Research outputs:

  • Recovery of smallholder banana production in BBTV affected areas through TC supply chains.
  • Recovery of smallholder banana production in BBTV affected areas through local macro-propagation.

Research activities:

  • Diagnostic tools
  • Genetic resource evaluation for mechanisms of tolerance and susceptibility and expression of
  • symptoms
  • Strategies for supplying clean planting material
  • Epidemiology of BBTV and aphids
  • Piloting integrated approaches to the recovery of BBTD affected areas

Full results
 

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Risk Assessment, Diagnostic Tools, Predicitve Models And Strategy For Disease Surveillance

Geert Claessens Thursday, 11 April 2013

Working group participants: Fen Beed and Jeff Daniells + sometimes Inge Van denBergh

Research outputs

  • national, regional, continental and global disease distribution maps
  • diagnostic tool kits for lab and field (factsheet, diagnostic keys, manuals, serological and molecularmethods)
  • agreed contingency plans to limit exotic disease outbreaks
  • establishment of protocols for management of endemic diseases
  • technical capacity created for disease diagnostics and reporting for research, extension and regulators
  • increasing awareness and advocacy to create an enabling policy environment
  • institutional strengthening and linkages to create a functional network to implement quarantine measures
  • create responsive extension system (mobile phones and plant clinics etc...)
  • create and manage knowledge database
  • develop risk assessment criteria for introduction of exotic and management of endemic diseases to guide
  • target areas surveillance, to refine mitigation strategies based on critical control points as influenced by
  • cultivation and trade parameters

Full results
 

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Sustainable intensification of banana-based cropping systems

Geert Claessens Thursday, 11 April 2013

Working group participants: Beloved Mensah Dzomeku, Paul Baiyeri, Thierry Lescot, Danny Coyne, Piet van Asten

Integrated crop intensification package adapted to the local biophysical and socio-economical environment

  • Quality planting material – cleaning and seed systems
  • Timing of production: sucker/planting timing (for high prices)
  • Select suitable varieties (fit for local market and agro-ecology)
  • Integrated Soil Fertility Management (ISFM)
  • Integrated Pest Management
  • Plant densities
  • Irrigation / water management
  • Improved intercrop systems

Full results

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Identification of priority intervention options and related research options

Geert Claessens Tuesday, 09 April 2013

A) The following intervention areas were formulated based on the 40 intervention options from the previous day:

  • Integrated cropping systems
  • Seed systems
  • Plant health management
  • Delivery systems
  • Genetic enhancement


B) Working groups were formed for each of the intervention areas. These groups took on the task of identifying three research options.  Their proposed research options were then discussed, combined and reformulated into the 8 research options found below.  These were reviewed in terms of the constraint or limiting factor they addressed, the adoptable innovation and the source of measureable impact:

  • Integrated management of Fusarium wilts (diagnostic tools, epidemiology, clean seed, agronomic and cultural practices, soil suppressiveness)
  • Management of BBTV and other viral diseases (diagnostic tools, epidemiology, clean seed, banana-free fallows, agronomic and cultural practices)
  • Integrated management of bacterial wilts in smallholder systems (diagnostic tools, epidemiology, clean seed, cultural and agronomic practices, mat management)
  • Risk assessment, diagnostic tools, predictive models and strategies for banana disease surveillance and quarantine and containment
  • Market-driven intensified banana based cropping systems (including nutrients, water, quality planting material, pests and diseases such as weevils, nematodes and Sigatoka, cultivar selection, gender roles and resource control, etc)
  • Breeding for higher yield, pest and disease resistance and consumer quality for smallholder banana, plantain and cooking banana cultivars
  • Better use and availability of existing genetic diversity for biotic and abiotic stress and consumer quality through evaluation and clonal selection
  • Extending utilization and reducing post-harvest losses

 

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AAA East African Highland Cultivar group

Geert Claessens Monday, 08 April 2013

Working group participants: Piet van Asten, Jackson Nkuba, Alex Barekye, Leena Tripathi, Eldad Karamura, Deborah Karamura, James Ssemwanga

The group first estimated a biological yield potential for monoculture under best growing conditions of 91 t/ha/year. They then analyzed two cases:

1. Location: Lake Victoria zone (central/south Uganda, NW Tanzania, East Rwanda - Production system: Dominant highland cooking banana

2. Location: High altitude (Albertine Rift, Mt. Elgon, Mt. Kilimanjaro, Pare Mountains) - Production system: Mixed highland cooking and beer banana systems

in terms of factors explaining yield variability in farmer fields. Then, they identified factors linked to market and post-harvest, gender and household resource endowment and trends and changes in markets, climate and disease presence in the same cases. Based on the discussion, they identified the following 8 intervention options which could contribute improved yield and income with applicability across major smallholder production zones. Most important to least important:

1. Presence of diseases and pests: banana weevil, nematodes, BXW, Black Sigatoka
2. Poor soil and water management
3. Lack of clean & quality planting material
4. On and off farm post harvest losses: perishability, bulkiness, lack of value addition raises transportation costs
5. Poor markets access: fragmented (producers not organized), unlinked, disorganized
6. Limited policy support and financial investment
7. Low genetic yield
8. Lack of coordination of banana research agenda at the discipline level

Full results

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AAA (Cavendish) Cultivar group

Geert Claessens Monday, 08 April 2013

Working group participants: Luis Perez Vicente, Jean-Pierre Horry, Thierry Lescot, Uma Subbaraya Chetty, Gus Molina, Dietmar Stoian

The group first estimated a biological yield potential for monoculture under best growing conditions of 240 t/ha/year. They then analyzed two cases:

1. Location: India, Brazil, Australia, China - Production system: Near intensive production export system and

2. Location: Indonesia - Production system: Mixed small holder systems

in terms of factors explaining yield variability in farmer fields.

Then, they identified factors linked to market and post-harvest, gender and household resource endowment and trends and changes in markets, climate and disease presence in the same cases. Based on the discussion, they identified the following 8 intervention options which could contribute improved yield and income with applicability across major smallholder production zones. Most important to least important:

We do NOT prioritize the following intervention options as they are location specific.
1.    Improved black Sigatoka management including alternatives to fungicides.
2.    Mitigation and prevention of spread of Fusarium wilt, BBTV and BXW.
3.    Improved cropping system including pest control.
4.    Improved seed systems.
5.    Farmers organization, including capacity building.
6.    Improved postharvest and processing practices.
7.    Improved marketing systems.
8.    Improved political and institutional frameworks.

Full results

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AAB Not Plantain Cultivar group

Geert Claessens Monday, 08 April 2013

Working group participants: Fréderic Bakry, Edson Perito Amorim, Jeff Daniells, Fen Beed, Célestin Niyongere

The group first estimated a biological yield potential for monoculture under best growing conditions of 116 t/ha/year. They then analyzed two cases:

1. Location: Bahia-Brazil (country, zone) - Cultivar name: Prata-Ana Production system: Perennial monoculture under irrigation

2. Location: East Africa (Low land areas): Burundi-Rwanda-Uganda and DR congo - Cultivar name: Kamaramasenge - Production system: Perennial and intercropping system

in terms of factors explaining yield variability in farmer fields. Then, they identified factors linked to market and post-harvest, gender and household resource endowment and trends and changes in markets, climate and disease presence in the same cases. Based on the discussion, they identified the following 8 intervention options which could contribute improved yield and income with applicability across major smallholder production zones. Most important to least important:

1. Social organization of farmers/Community based system to better organize production and marketing.
2. Government support in organization of farmers
3. Diseases diagnostic/quarantine and management
4. Promote the use of clean planting material
5. Develop improved varieties: more productive, resistant to main diseases and of high quality of fruits
6. Improve irrigation skills of farmers
7. Better nutrition of banana plants: Fertilizers, manure and compost
8. Increase awareness of farmers by trainings and feed-back on different topics related to banana production and chain value.

Full results

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AAB Plantain Cultivar group

Geert Claessens Monday, 08 April 2013

Working group participants: Rony Swennen, Beloved Mensah Dzomeku, Gerard Ngoh, Rodomiro Ortiz, Paul Baiyeri, Guy Blomme, Danny Coyne

The group first estimated a biological yield potential for monoculture under best growing conditions of 14 to 20 t/ha/year. They then analyzed two cases:

1. Location: Nigeria, Degraded forest - Cultivar name: False Horn - Production system:  Plantain-based systems with short fallow with not more than two (2) crop cycles

2. Location: Cameroun: Household and backyards - Cultivar name: French - Production system: Backyards with household refuse as inputs

in terms of factors explaining yield variability in farmer fields. Then, they identified factors linked to market and post-harvest, gender and household resource endowment and trends and changes in markets, climate and disease presence in the same cases. Based on the discussion, they identified the following 8 intervention options which could contribute improved yield and income with applicability across major smallholder production zones. Most important to least important:

1. High true put production of healthy quality planting material (to allow for other interventions)
2. Agronomy: Dissemination of improved crop and resources management practices in plantain-based systems
3. Breeding: Whole plant resistance –black sigatoka, lesion and burrowing nematodes, bunchy top disease and Xanthomonas wilt
4. Decide and act on BSV affecting multiplication and exchange of germplasm
5. Improving the morpho-physiology of plantain (poor root system, apical dominance in mats leading to yield decline and poor suckering
6. Postharvest: Improving hybrid with desire characteristics for local market
7. Improving cultivars with short crop stature and crop cycle
8. Integrated soil fertility management for plantain-based farming systems

Full results

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ABB - Pisang Awak Cultivar group

Geert Claessens Monday, 08 April 2013

Working group participants: Lavern Gueco, Inge Van den Bergh, Anne Rietfeld, Dominique Dufour, Nicolas Roux, Jim Lorenzen

The group first estimated a biological yield potential for monoculture under best growing conditions of 55 to 61 t/ha/year. They then analyzed two cases:

1. Location: India, Southern India - Cultivar name: Karpooravalli (Pisang Awak) - Production system: Small-holder monoculture 1+2, irrigated

2. Location: Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi, Eastern DRC - Cultivar name: Kayinja (Pisang Awak) - Production system: Low-maintenance, perennial, rain-fed, low-density

in terms of factors explaining yield variability in farmer fields. Then, they identified factors linked to market and post-harvest, gender and household resource endowment and trends and changes in markets, climate and disease presence in the same cases. Based on the discussion, they identified the following 7 intervention options which could contribute improved yield and income with applicability across major smallholder production zones. Most important to least important:

1. Improved processing; development of better high-value products (reasons: high yield potential, consumer preference, high Brix)
2. Value chain development: Increase production and link farmers with urban processors, and development of rural processing facilities, product differentiation/diversification (quality, packaging, …), improved transport and marketing opportunities (now it is second-priority after Grand Nain)
3. Increased use of GR (screen of ABB types for East Africa) for productivity and Foc and BXW resistance, including selection of better clonal variants, and GMOs for BXW and Foc
4. Access to high-yielding, disease-free good planting material
5. Improved field management (disease - Foc, BXW, BBrMV, irrigation, desuckering, weeding, …) and extension (mindset has to be changed)
6. Improved labour use efficiency, both in production and processing
7. Explore new production areas

Full results
 

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